Author Topic: Anki are cross platform, friendly, intelligent flash cards for memorization.  (Read 1399 times)

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Anki are cross platform, friendly, intelligent flash cards for memorization.



Quote
   Remember Anything
 From images to scientific markup, Anki has got you covered.
    Remember Anywhere
Review on Windows, Mac, Linux, iOS, Android, and any device with a web browser.
    Remember Efficiently
 Only practice the material that you're about to forget.
   

  About Anki  Anki is a program which makes remembering things easy. Because it's a lot more efficient than traditional study methods, you can either greatly decrease your time spent studying, or greatly increase the amount you learn.
 Anyone who needs to remember things in their daily life can benefit from Anki. Since it is content-agnostic and supports images, audio, videos and scientific markup (via LaTeX), the possibilities are endless.
 For example:
 
  • Learning a language
  • Studying for medical and law exams
  • Memorizing people's names and faces
  • Brushing up on geography
  • Mastering long poems
  • Even practicing guitar chords!
Features    Synchronization
Use the free AnkiWeb synchronization service to keep your cards in sync across multiple devices.
 Flexibilty
From card layout to review timing, Anki has a wealth of options for you to customize.
 Media-Rich
Embed audio clips, images, videos and scientific markup on your cards, with precise control over how it's shown.
    Optimized
 Anki will handle decks of 100,000+ cards with no problems.
 Fully Extensible
 There are a large number of add-ons available.
 Open Source
Because the code and storage format is open, your important data is safe.
     
Introduction

Anki is a program which makes remembering things easy. Because it is a lot more efficient than traditional study methods, you can either greatly decrease your time spent studying, or greatly increase the amount you learn.

Anyone who needs to remember things in their daily life can benefit from Anki. Since it is content-agnostic and supports images, audio, videos and scientific markup (via LaTeX), the possibilities are endless. For example:

    learning a language

    studying for medical and law exams

    memorizing people’s names and faces

    brushing up on geography

    mastering long poems

    even practicing guitar chords!

There are two simple concepts behind Anki: active recall testing and spaced repetition. They are not known to most learners, despite having been written about in the scientific literature for many years. Understanding how they work will make you a more effective learner.


Active Recall Testing

Active recall testing means being asked a question and trying to remember the answer. This is in contrast to passive study, where we read, watch or listen to something without pausing to consider if we know the answer. Research has shown that active recall testing is far more effective at building strong memories than passive study. There are two reasons for this:

    The act of recalling something strengthens the memory, increasing the chances we’ll be able to remember it again

    When we’re unable to answer a question, it tells us we need to return to the material to review or relearn it

You have probably encountered active recall testing in your school years without even realizing it. When good teachers give you a series of questions to answer after reading an article, or make you take weekly progress-check tests, they are not doing it simply to see if you understood the material or not. By testing you, they are increasing the chances you will be able to remember the material in the future.

A good way to integrate active recall testing into your own studies is to use flashcards. With traditional paper flashcards, you write a question on one side of a card, and the answer on the other side. By not turning the card over until you’ve thought about the answer, you can learn things more effectively than passive observation allows.


Use It or Lose It

Our brains are efficient machines, and they rapidly discard information that doesn’t seem useful. Chances are that you don’t remember what you had for dinner on Monday two weeks ago, because this information is not usually useful. If you went to a fantastic restaurant that day and spent the last two weeks telling people about how great it was, however, you’re likely to still remember in vivid detail.

The brain’s "use it or lose it" policy applies to everything we learn. If you spend an afternoon memorizing some science terms, and then don’t think about that material for two weeks, you’ll probably have forgotten most of it. In fact, studies show we forget about 75% of material learnt within a 48 hour period. This can seem pretty depressing when you need to learn a lot of information.

The solution is simple, however: review. By reviewing newly-learnt information, we can greatly reduce forgetting.

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